Virginia children’s health system CEO resigns, successor named | MED MOVES

Henry Ford Health names a new hospital president, Stanford Health hires a chief quality officer, and other leaders take new roles.

Virginia children’s health system CEO resigns, successor named

The CHKD Health System, a pediatric health system in Virginia, is getting new leadership in the new year.

Jim Dahling, CHKD’s president and CEO, will retire in 2023. Amy Sampson, CHKD’s senior vice president, chief engagement and innovation officer, has been named the next president and CEO.

In addition, the system is revising its leadership structure. Christopher Foley, vice president, chief of medicine, will assume the newly created position of chief clinical operations officer.

The three leaders will work together on the transition over the next several months.

Sampson joined CHKD in 1990 and was the board’s unanimous choice to succeed Dahling, said Akhil Jain, the board’s chairman.

“I am deeply honored to continue to serve CHKD and the children and families of our region in this new role,” Sampson said in a statement. “I believe with all my heart in our people, our mission, our community, and above all, in identifying and addressing the healthcare needs of our children as they evolve in the coming years.”

Dahling came to Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters (CHKD) in 1994 as vice president and chief operating officer. He assumed leadership of the system in 2003.

Dahling was praised for his leadership and the expansion of the system.

“It has been a privilege to lead this organization,” says Dahling. “CHKD is a remarkable family of extraordinary clinicians, surrounded by exceptional team members and bolstered by our King’s Daughters and volunteers, all of whom are steadfast in their dedication to doing what is best and right for children.”

Henry Ford Health announces new hospital president

Emily Moorhead has been named the new president of the Henry Ford Jackson Hospital in Jackson, Michigan, part of the Henry Ford Health System.

Moorhead has served as interim president since February 2022. Previously, she served as chief operating officer.

She brings more than 15 years of experience to the new role. Before joining Henry Ford Health, she held leadership positions in hospital operations and health system strategy at Tenet and Trinity Health.

“I am continually inspired by the strength and heart of this organization,” Moorhead said in a statement. “It is truly an honor to continue to work with such a strong team and committed community.”

Denise Brooks-Williams, Henry Ford Health’s senior vice president, and CEO of Market Operations described Moorhead as “a transformational leader.”

“We are so pleased she will have the opportunity to build on the momentum she’s already inspired in this critical leadership role, both for the hospital and the communities that count on us for care,” Brooks-Williams said in a statement.

Henry Ford Jackson Hospital Board Chair Martha Fuerstenau said in a statement, “Emily has consistently demonstrated her passion for improving the overall health of the communities we serve and the well-being of the team who serves them. That passion, coupled with her proven ability to lead strategic direction and operational improvements, make her the ideal fit.”

Stanford Children’s Health hires chief quality officer

Grace Lee has been named the chief quality officer at Stanford Medicine Children's Health and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

Lee will begin her new role on Dec. 12. She will oversee healthcare quality and safety at Stanford Medicine Children's Health.

Lee joined Stanford Medicine Children's Health in 2017 as the associate chief medical officer of practice Innovation. She worked closely with quality improvement, nursing, and infection control teams to address central line–associated bloodstream infections in children.

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged in 2020, Dr. Lee led the work being done to ensure the safety of Stanford Children's Health's patients and workforce. She worked alongside other physicians and leaders on a host of issues, including infection control response and testing, treatment, and prevention measures.

She is a professor of pediatrics (Infectious Disease) at Stanford Medicine and chair of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. In addition, she was recently elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

American Association of Medical Assistants elects president

Deborah Novak has been elected as the new president of the American Association of Medical Assistants.

She was named president for 2022-23 at the 66th AAMA Annual Conference.

"I am eager to help employers find qualified medical assistants," Novak said in a statement. "My goal is to cultivate opportunities for current medical assistants and to educate students on the rewards of a career in the health care industry."

The AAMA said Novak's leadership expertise will advance the organization's mission of providing medical assistants with educational opportunities nationwide.

Novak joined the AAMA Board of Trustees in 2014 and has worked in health care for over 35 years, specializing in practice management and administration. She is currently an associate practice administrator at TriHealth Physician Partners Anderson.

She has successfully managed group practices and staffs of up to 50 team members.

Ozarks Healthcare announces new chief nursing officer

Lacey Carter has been promoted to chief nursing officer of Ozarks Healthcare.

Carter had been executive director of nursing at Ozarks Healthcare. In her new role, Carter will oversee the operations of all nursing services across Ozarks Healthcare.

She was named executive director of nursing at Ozarks Healthcare in 2019. She also previously served as director of women’s services and director of education at Ozarks Healthcare.

Tom Keller, Ozarks Healthcare President and CEO, said in a statement, “Lacey’s knowledge, skills, thoughtfulness, commitment and passion for serving others make her an exceptional nurse and servant leader. Ozarks Healthcare is blessed to have Lacey.”

“You will see Lacey in scrubs one day rounding on coworkers and at the bedside with patients, and then in business attire the next day making sure her teams have the support they need and deserve,” Keller said. “Lacey’s patient-centered approach is at the core of our service standards and who we are at Ozarks Healthcare.”

Ozarks, based in West Plains, Missouri, operates a 114-bed acute care hospital and a host of clinics.